#Shared_Data

The dominant metaphor for organizing in the 21st century is the network. Fuelled by advances in information and communication technologies, networks allow for rapid dissemination and sharing of information, lateral communication, flexibility in the relationships between actors, and using complementary strengths. Various online communities, such as the maker movement, coding communities, or knowledge communities such as Wikipedia embrace this metaphor. What these communities have in common is believing in freely sharing knowledge and information.

On the other hand, there are global corporations such as Amazon, Facebook, Google. While these platforms in principle embrace the openness of networks (e.g., anyone can principally join) they created "gated networks." They control the infrastructure, determine rules for participating and sharing information, as well as generating economic and political power through levering the data in their networks (the insights of these data remains in their hands). 

These two examples should illustrate there are multiple meanings and consequences of sharing data in a globalized world. At the opening week, we will further probe into these and other meanings of shared data. This is imperative. Data is an essential resource in a digital economy and society. 

Moderator for #SharedData

Tho­mas Ge­gen­hu­ber is as­sis­tant pro­fes­sor for busi­ness ad­mi­nis­tra­ti­on with an em­pha­sis on di­gi­tal trans­for­ma­ti­on at Leu­pha­na Uni­ver­si­ty Lüne­burg. He holds a doc­to­ral de­gree in busi­ness ad­mi­nis­tra­ti­on from Jo­han­nes Kep­ler Uni­ver­si­ty (JKU) Linz. As part of his doc­to­ral stu­dies, fun­ded by grants from the Aus­tri­an Aca­de­my of Sci­en­ces and the Aus­tri­an Fe­deral Mi­nis­try of Sci­ence, Re­se­arch and Eco­no­my, he vi­si­ted the Uni­ver­si­ty Al­ber­ta, FU Ber­lin and the Uni­ver­si­ty of Edin­burgh.

Here you can find all project themes which belong to #SharedData. Please scroll further down to see all themes and advisors.

A critical perspective on the use of consumer data as source for innovation

Description

Masses of data on consumer behaviour are steadily being generated as a result of the ubiquity of "smart" devices and internet usage. Companies look to exploit this data to create and improve products and services, or even business models. The data is therefore considered a critical resource for businesses. It is however generated by consumers, which might not or only indirectly reap the benefits of innovations based on their data. This raises concerns regarding the ethics of the use of consumer data towards innovation.

Advisor

My name is Felix Krieger and I'm a Ph.D. researcher at the Institute of Information Systems. My research lies at the intersection of science and practice, promoting the exchange between both areas. Before starting the Ph.D., I obtained a Master's degree from the Leuphana. When not researching, I enjoy traveling and live music.

What does „Sharing in a Globalized World“ mean to you personally?

"Sharing in a globalized World" means to me the free exchange of ideas and information across the globe, promoting education and cross-cultural communication.

Can social media change the course of the future?

Description

Around the world, over 3 billion people use social media. We use it for every part of our lives – in our personal relationships, for entertainment, at work and in our studies. Social media is not just changing the way we communicate – it’s changing the way we do business, the way we are governed, and the way we live in society. There is so much instant access to information. So, how do we take it to make smart, informed decisions that could have an impact on the future?

Advisor

Mariele Müller is a freelance consultant for strategy and innovation. She develops together with organizations and communes ideas on how they want to live, work or learn in the future.

What does „Sharing in a Globalized World“ mean to you personally?

It means, being able to find inspiring people and stories from all over the world that encourage you to take the next step. It means, being able to find answers to questions that we haven’t been able to solve ourselves.

Gender & Data in the age of AI

Description

In this project work, you will critically engage with questions of bias and discrimination in the age of artificial intelligence (AI). How is gender (mis)represented in data, how do systems fail and, how does the way these systems are designed are amplify and worsening already existing social divisions? How are the metrics of AI, like face detection, discipline us in order to be readable for a machine? What forms of collective critique can we develop?

Advisor

Ariana Dongus is a research assistant at University of Arts in Design Karlsruhe. After graduating from European Media Science at the University of Potsdam, she worked as a freelance journalist and film maker and studied directing with a focus on documentary forms at the self-organised film school filmArche in Berlin. She is a PhD candidate at University of Arts and Design at Karlsruhe since 2018 where she also coordinates KIM, a research group for critical studies in artificial intelligence. In exploring the intersection of biometrics, colonial pasts, new forms of work and machine intelligence, she contributes to a critique of today’s digital economies.

What does "Sharing in a Globalized World?" mean to you personally?

Sharing in a globalised world means to me sharing responsibility; and raising awareness that the crises of contemporaneity, like the climate crisis, cannot be discussed only in terms of exploiting natural resources, but rather need to be understood as intersecting with global issues of capitalism and social discrimination as well.

 

How open is Open Strategy?

Description

An increasing number of organizations such as Daimler, IBM and Red Hat have adopted what has been called ‘‘open strategy”. This novel strategy-making practice is a particular form of crowdsourcing. Enabled by modern information technologies, organizations open up their strategic considerations to large numbers of internal and external people. Scholars have revealed that this new phenomenon will change strategy work as it gives the crowd the opportunity to actively take part in decision-making and to jointly develop strategic directions. But it also raises the question of how much openness a company actually tolerates. Therefore, our project group will confront the issue to what extent external parties can have a say and who makes the final decision.

Advisor

Marina Schneider studies Management and Business Development at Leuphana University Lüneburg and is currently writing her Master Thesis researching in the field of open strategy. She works at the Institute of Management and Organization for Thomas Gegenhuber, an as­sis­tant pro­fes­sor for business ad­mi­nis­tra­ti­on with an em­pha­sis on di­gi­tal trans­for­ma­ti­on.

What does "Sharing in a Globalized World"  mean to you personally?

Sharing is caring! That always crossed my mind when I thought about sharing. I like the idea of an altruistic mindset that makes the world a better place. However, in the age of new information technologies, sharing has taken on a completely new meaning and far-reaching dimensions. "Sharing" has somehow switched to profiting from other people's needs and led to the emergence of new business models. Therefore, to me, sharing in a globalized world mainly means living in a collaborative world. 

 

Media for a Globalized Audience

Description

The sheer pace of technological change and the phenomenal global expansion of media and communications over the past 2-3 decades have raised a number of questions concerning what we do with the digital media and how the digital media shapes the socio-cultural, political, economic, ethical and moral dimensions of our lives in this world. How does media affect our lives? What does digitization afford and what is lost as the world is becoming digitized? As lots of things around us turn digital, have we started telling stories, sharing experiences, and replaying memories differently? In the context of globalization, the audience is more individual, diverse and independent, and the media technology is more advanced, which might impose challenges for the media.

Advisor

Originally from Cheng Du, China, I am a doctoral student in the institute of culture and aesthetics of digital media at the Leuphana University of Lüneburg and also have taught in Thailand and China for 5 years. My main field of research is digital media and culture, especially film and television media and documentary culture research. My main project is to design media products for a global audience. In connection with this, I also investigated the integration and collision of social media in the context of globalization. I'm a fair avid fan of the movies, eating at good restaurants in Germany, walking, traveling and fitness. 

 

Open Source as a Sustainable Practice: Knowledge Commons under the Conditions of Variance

Description

The rediscovery of the commons, in response to increasing global conflicts over the environment and its resources, has also invaded digital sphere: Open source discloses how things function, how they are produced and modified, how they can be used, reproduced, repaired and developed further. The audience abandons their role as consumers and makes things themselves!
The project group discusses digital practices of Open Knowledge as technological, social and economic innovation in the age of plural societies: as a criterion of democratic participation, as a factor of inclusion and exclusion, as a laboratory of self-efficacy and as a correction model for market design.

Advisor

Thorsten Philipp is a political scientist and Romance scholar. He works as a research advisor for the president of Technische Universität Berlin, and additionally, he is lecturer at Leuphana University, Zeppelin University Friedrichshafen and the University of Freiburg. In his research, Thorsten combines analysis on sustainability theories, political communication, social ethics and pop cultures. Apart from his scientific activities, he holds an honorary appointment at the German Federation for Environment and Nature Conservation (BUND).

What does "Sharing in a Globalized World" mean to you personally?

Sharing in a globalized world means to me: combine all our efforts to discover, to understand and to protect the manifold and fascinating resources of our common future. 

Platform Cooperatives

Description

We live in a so-called platform economy - Amazon, Google, Facebook, and others penetrate all domains of social and economic life. However, these platforms face also a lot of criticism, such as disregard for privacy or ignoring labor rights. Rather than sole hoping for regulation, there is a social movement seeking to popularize an alternative organizational form for platforms - so-called platform cooperatives. In our group, we will inquire into what platform cooperatives are, review best-practice examples, and assess the potential and challenges of this new organizational form.

Advisor

Thomas Gegenhuber is assistant professor for business administration with an emphasis on digital transformation at Leuphana University Lüneburg. He holds a doctoral degree in business administration from Johannes Kepler University (JKU) Linz. As part of his doctoral studies, funded by grants from the Austrian Academy of Sciences and the Austrian Federal Ministry of Science, Research and Economy, he visited the University Alberta, FU Berlin and the University of Edinburgh. Under the umbrella of digital transformation, Thomas researches novel forms of organizing, crowdsourcing, various types of openness (open strategy, open innovation, and open government) and (cultural) entrepreneurship in a digital economy. Thomas’ work appears in international journals such as Long Range Planning, Business & Society, Government Information Quarterly and Information & Organization. Furthermore, he is a frequent speaker at academic as well as practitioner-oriented conferences.

What does „Sharing in a Globalized World“ mean to you personally?

"Sharing in a globalized world means to me inquiring how we use digital technologies to span boundaries across communities, regions, and nations. For instance, leveraging digital technologies help us to share knowledge around the world. Take Youtube - it has become the biggest source of useful how-to videos. At the same time, we observe that YouTube algorithms favor sharing of messages that result in a lot of clicks, including hate speech. We need to understand that examining sharing in a globalized world must go hand-in-hand with questions of governance - including issues of power dynamics and unintended consequences ."

Quantified Self – The Quantification of Life

Description

10.000 steps a day. That is the recommendation of the World Health Organization for a longer and healthier life, but our smartphones and other smart gadgets not only gather data about our steps and whereabouts. Scholars are already talking about “The Quantification of Life”. Activity and productivity apps help to gather data about our most intimate, private and daily experiences and habits. Why is this data about ourselves so powerful? Why so seductive? And why so valuable for the economy?

Advisor

Laura Hille studied Sociology and Cultural Anthropology at the University of Hamburg. She is a PhD student at Leuphana University Lüneburg and works on Biohacking, Biopolitics and the (bio-)technological reformulation of life. Her research interests follow the merging of men and machine and the questions that arise when technology goes under the skin.

What does „Sharing in a Globalized World“ mean to you personally?

We all know the catchphrase “Sharing is Caring” and it still holds some truth to me. The positive connotations – of sharing knowledge, sharing access, sharing a common world or sharing responsibility and empathy – come to mind. But the economy has a fascinating way to capture these positive connotations for specific goals. Sharing, then, becomes an invocation, a ‘you should’ and this you is being held responsible and has to adapt to a globalized, digitized world. * Sharing can never mean one thing, especially in a globalized world.

Sharing Cultural Heritage

Description

Cultural heritage has become a core research topic. In a globalised world, various forms of cultural heritage serve as resources for determining social dynamics like integration and exclusion. Cultural heritage belongs to everyone. It was created by and for all kinds of people. Cultural heritage implies a shared bond, our belonging to a community. It represents our history and our identity; our bond to the past, to our present, and the future. How can access be provided?

Advisor

Ingrid Leonie Severin is Art & Cultural Historian, researcher, producer and museum & exhibition curator. She studied Art History at Rheinisch-Westfälisch-Technische Hochschule RWTH Aachen, Max Planck Institutes in Florence and Rom (completing her PhD research at Deutsches Kunsthistorisches Institut & Bibliotheca Hertziana) PhD in 1987. She worked as curator for Museums in Aachen & Cologne, Stiftung Preußischer Kulturbesitz SMPK Berlin and Museum für Gestaltung in Zürich (exhibitions- and work-catalogues). She has been research assistant at the Institute for Advanced Study Princeton. She lectured at RWTH Aachen and University Vienna, department of Art History with Professor F.T. Bach on Contemporary Art, specializing in the Art of the Fifties & Sixties. At Fraunhofer Institute for Media Communication, Sankt Augustin (2000) she worked as knowledge manager of the department of Virtual Environments (IMK VE) and New Media.

What does „Sharing in a Globalized World“ mean to you personally?

It means give access to all cultural (re)sources of our past and present, helping to create and shape a deeper and mutual understanding.

 

Smart City! Stupid City?! Reconfiguring Cities in the Age of Big Data.

Description

Cities have become crucial spaces for the social challenges of digitalisation. Advances in big data, artificial intelligence or the internet of things pose new critical questions: Who creates the data and who is excluded? Who owns the data that is produced? And, what happens when private companies such as Google provide data-driven solutions to city councils? In this project group, we’ll assess the current promises and threats of smart cities and reconfigure them both from visionary and critical perspectives.

Advisor

Katrin Fritsch is a data and society researcher and writer. She is co-founder of MOTIF Institute for Digital Culture, an independent think tank that operates at the intersection of technology and society. In her work, Katrin advocates for sustainable technologies and bold visions of the future. She creates formats that enable public engagement in digitalisation and that ensure both an ethical and environmentally just approach to technologies.

What does „Sharing in a Globalized World“ mean to you personally? 

Sharing tactics against social inequality and climate crisis - with the help of sustainable tech. Sharing infrastructures, technologies and data that empower people - not companies. Sharing fears - but also sharing visions for a better future.

The Impact of Sharing Economy

Description

“The world’s largest taxi firm, Uber, owns no cars. The world’s most popular media company, Facebook, creates no content. The world’s most valuable retailer, Alibaba, carries no stock. And the world’s largest accommodation provider, Airbnb, owns no property” – Tom Goodwin. In the last few years, business models changed tremendously from traditional manufacturing to offering platforms and services. Platform economy is the digital enabler for sharing and changed our way of using products and services in a very short amount of time. Shared access instead of individual ownership means, using resources more effective due to the adaptation of products to the personal demand. Besides sharing between private persons, traditional businesses try to rethink their business models, to create sharing concepts for their products.

Advisor

Ole Paulsen is Management Consultant at MHP – A Porsche Company for Mobility Services & Strategy and Digital Innovation & Designmanagement. He graduated in Management & Data Science at Leuphana University and is now focusing on the development of data-driven business models as well as platform economy and business intelligence in the automotive industry. Since 2012 he is taking part in the Leuphana Opening Week.

What does „Sharing in a Globalized World“ mean to you personally?

Too many assets are used inefficient due to individual ownership. It is important to figure out, which things I need to own individually and which ones are useable based on a sharing system. Whether it is sharing access for others or getting access to things I need in a specific situation for a short amount of time, sharing enables a more reflective and efficient use of my own and others resources. These inherent potentials and values are feasible through platform economy and globalized collaborative work.