Course Schedule

Veranstaltungen von Prof. Dr. Roman Trötschel


Lehrveranstaltungen

Internship Major Psychologie (Praktikum) (FSL) (Seminar)

Dozent/in: Roman Trötschel

Termin:
Einzeltermin | Di, 15.10.2024, 10:15 - Di, 15.10.2024, 11:45 | C 40.704 Seminarraum
Einzeltermin | Di, 21.01.2025, 09:00 - Di, 21.01.2025, 18:00 | C 40.606 Seminarraum

Inhalt: Internships provide students majoring in psychology with practical experience and help students gain insights into the ins and outs of working in the field. Although internships for psychology major vary depending on the work area and the employer, there are some elements that all students across positions share: students can gain professional skills that are difficult to learn in a classroom setting, and they are given opportunities to horn the knowledge learned at the university in internships. Importantly, these experiences allow students to see what takes place behind the scenes, which helps to smooth the transition from university work to a professional role. Internships provide students with references based on which they could deliberate which area they want to spend their careers in. Given this, in this seminar, we will discuss students’ experiences of their internships (e.g., whether did they do their internship? Why did they choose this internship? What was the motivation? What did they expect from the internship? What were the activities/tasks accomplished in the internship) and their reflections on their internships. Specifically, based on students’ internship experiences, we will discuss the transfer from theory to practice (e.g., was the knowledge gained from studies of psychology relevant during the internship? Did the knowledge help the students to understand or facilitate certain aspects of the internship? Did the knowledge open up intriguing perspectives or even enable students to put interesting suggestions into practice?) and the fulfillment of their expectations (e.g., did the internship meet students’ expectations? What did they learn and take with them? Did the internship influence their choice of career?). In the first meeting, we will discuss the administrative issues of the seminar, including course schedule and structure, expectations from and on students. In the second meeting, we organize a practice forum to discuss students’ experience of their internships, their feedback, and insights regarding the theory-practice transfer

Colloquium Advanced empirical research projects (Seminar)

Dozent/in: Roman Trötschel

Termin:
14-täglich | Donnerstag | 10:15 - 11:45 | 24.10.2024 - 31.01.2025 | C 9.102 Seminarraum | Starts in the first week of the semester

Colloquium Bachelor Theses (Kolloquium)

Dozent/in: Roman Trötschel

Termin:
14-täglich | Donnerstag | 10:15 - 11:45 | 17.10.2024 - 01.12.2024 | C 9.102 Seminarraum | Starts in the 2nd week of the semester

Inhalt: The Bachelor's thesis requires the students to scientifically examine a defined topic from the field of psychology and to write it up within 9 weeks, followed by an examination discussion (12 CP). Participation in a colloquium (3 CP) during the elaboration offers assistance in the development process of the Bachelor thesis.

Psychology and the Society: Political Negotiations and Sustainability (Seminar)

Dozent/in: Roman Trötschel

Termin:
wöchentlich | Donnerstag | 14:15 - 15:45 | 14.10.2024 - 31.01.2025 | C 11.308 Seminarraum

Inhalt: The course deals with psychological processes in political negotiations in the context of ecological, economic, or societal transformations (i.e., transformation negotiations). Transformation negotiations can be defined as joint and interactive decision-making processes aimed at solving present and future social conflicts arising from economic, ecological, societal, or cultural transitions. Transformation negotiations seek to promote sustainable development through (a) incorporating interests across multiple outcome levels such as economic, ecological, and social levels, (b) integrating multilateral interests of parties at and beyond the negotiation table, and (c) balancing short-term and long-term consequences across a prolonged time period. Accordingly, transformation negotiations have the object of solving conflicts on multiple dimensions to promote interlocal, intersectional, and intergenerational justice. From a psychological standpoint, negotiating transformation is particularly challenging as it evokes various social conflicts at different levels (e.g.,intrapersonal, interpersonal, intragroup, and intergroup conflicts) and thus raises cognitive demands. Under this circumstance, negotiators need to make tradeoffs across various outcome dimensions (e.g., economic, ecologic, and social outcomes). They must take external parties’ interests into consideration and need to balance immediate and future consequences resulting from their negotiated agreements. In sum, parties in transformation negotiations must not only solve their social conflicts at the table but must also reconcile various types of other conflicts beyond the table (e.g., conflicts between present and future generations, conflicts being present vs. absent from the table, conflicts across various outcome dimensions such ecological vs. economic outcomes). Accordingly, sustainable conflict solutions through negotiations can only be achieved when negotiators take all “externalities” arising from their agreements into account. The course ‘Psychology and Society: Political Negotiations and Sustainability’ will focus on psychological drivers and barriers in transformation negotiations in the context of political decision-making. Specifically, the course will deal with biased perceptions, erroneous beliefs, or self-defensive cognitions that hinder the achievement of sustainable agreements. Beneficial psychological drivers in transformation negotiations such as perspective taking, accountability beliefs, or shared cognition will also be discussed and addressed in the course. Further, from a motivational perspective, the course will deal with the impact of competitive versus cooperative negotiation strategies aimed at the transition towards sustainability (e.g., logrolling, expanding the pie, collectivizing vs. threating, contending, bluffing). Finally, from a group research perspective, the effect of social identification (individual vs. group identification), group processes (group losses vs. gains), and group representation (representatives vs. constituency) will be examined. The acquired knowledge from the course will be applied to real-world examples of political negotiations involving economic, ecological, societal, or cultural issues aimed at the transition towards sustainability.