Vorlesungsverzeichnis

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Lehrveranstaltungen

Introduction to Political Sociology and Political Culture (Vorlesung)

Dozent/in: Olga Griaznova

Termin:
wöchentlich | Dienstag | 12:15 - 13:45 | 17.10.2022 - 03.02.2023 | C HS 4

Inhalt: The course aims to introduce students to the basic concepts of political sociology and political culture. It describes origins of state and power, the nature of political process and action, what factors shape and influence them. In contrast to the general political science and political theory the course mainly focuses on the individual political attitudes and behavior, group actions, the way how individuals and groups manifest political behavior and affect politics at different levels. The course address peculiarities of totalitarian, authoritarian and democratic political systems by comparing the social and cultural principles that underlie them. We will examine the historical background to the development of democracy, the drivers of emancipatory values and democratic principles. An important component of the course is a discussion of the principles of political culture formation, the factors that maintain its stability, change it or destroy it. We will link the discussion of the functioning of political culture at the macro level to an understanding of how it manifests itself at the micro level. To do so, we will look at specific empirical studies that allow us to come close to understanding how people understand politics, what determines people's political attitudes, and what people base their political action on. The lecture course consists of three core units. The first unit of the course focuses on the origins and status quo of existing forms of social and political relations. In particular, this unit examines the principles of state formation and power relations, the principles of political culture underlying totalitarian, dictatorial and democratic regimes. The second module looks at particular types of social change and conflict. Dividing the types of social change according to the scale of involvement of different social groups, we consider the variation of different social movements from small-scale to macro-social processes such as wars and revolutions. A structural approach to the issue of social change and conflict is important in this module. Directly related to social conflict is the issue of stratification and inequality, which is the essence of the third module. This module illustrates the issue through an analysis of economic, racial, ethnic and gender inequalities. The final lectures of the course draw attention to mechanisms for resolving social tensions and managing social inequalities.

Introduction to Political Sociology and Political Culture - A (Seminar)

Dozent/in: Stefan Kruse

Termin:
wöchentlich | Donnerstag | 14:15 - 15:45 | 17.10.2022 - 03.02.2023 | C 40.146

Inhalt: This course focuses on citizens' role in the democratic process, how this role has changed over time, and how these changes are altering the nature of democracy. The quality of democracy is primarily measured by the active participation of all citizens in political processes, the responsiveness of rulers to popular demands, and the protection of individuals' rights and freedoms across all social groups. For voters to make meaningful decisions and influence government actions, they must know something about the issues, understand the available options, and need sufficient knowledge of how the political system works. Against this backdrop, this course addresses some of the major controversies in political sociology and political behavior research. The first part of the course illustrates the continuing debate about the political abilities of average citizens and the extent to which public opinion surveys allow researchers to study individuals' motivations and expectations to better understand and predict human behavior. The second part of the course focuses on political participation. Based on international public opinion data, we will explore patterns of citizen participation and examine the causes and consequences of citizen involvement in institutionalized and non-institutionalized forms of political participation across different countries. The third part of the course focuses on political culture research and its contribution to better understanding the social roots of democracy and how these roots are transforming through modernization. We will pay particular attention to the role of civic engagement, social capital, value orientations, and political support in a comparative perspective. Against this backdrop, the fourth part of the course introduces students to the study of electoral behavior contrasting the main approaches to explaining participation and voting choice. The course also addresses various aspects of representation in liberal democracies.

Introduction to Political Sociology and Political Culture - B (Seminar)

Dozent/in: Stefan Kruse

Termin:
wöchentlich | Donnerstag | 16:15 - 17:45 | 17.10.2022 - 03.02.2023 | C 40.146

Inhalt: his course focuses on citizens' role in the democratic process, how this role has changed over time, and how these changes are altering the nature of democracy. The quality of democracy is primarily measured by the active participation of all citizens in political processes, the responsiveness of rulers to popular demands, and the protection of individuals' rights and freedoms across all social groups. For voters to make meaningful decisions and influence government actions, they must know something about the issues, understand the available options, and need sufficient knowledge of how the political system works. Against this backdrop, this course addresses some of the major controversies in political sociology and political behavior research. The first part of the course illustrates the continuing debate about the political abilities of average citizens and the extent to which public opinion surveys allow researchers to study individuals' motivations and expectations to better understand and predict human behavior. The second part of the course focuses on political participation. Based on international public opinion data, we will explore patterns of citizen participation and examine the causes and consequences of citizen involvement in institutionalized and non-institutionalized forms of political participation across different countries. The third part of the course focuses on political culture research and its contribution to better understanding the social roots of democracy and how these roots are transforming through modernization. We will pay particular attention to the role of civic engagement, social capital, value orientations, and political support in a comparative perspective. Against this backdrop, the fourth part of the course introduces students to the study of electoral behavior contrasting the main approaches to explaining participation and voting choice. The course also addresses various aspects of representation in liberal democracies.