Vorlesungsverzeichnis

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Lehrveranstaltungen

General Psychology II: Motivation Science (Vorlesung)

Dozent/in: Timur Sevincer

Termin:
wöchentlich | Donnerstag | 08:15 - 09:45 | 17.10.2022 - 03.02.2023 | C 40.501

Inhalt: Motivation Science is a course that provides students with general knowledge of motivational processes, their origins, and their significant role in human decision processes and behaviors. In this course, you will explore the major factors underlying human actions. What motivates people to perform certain behaviors over others? What gives people the energy and direction to move forward? What keeps people going in the face of challenges and difficulties? This course is about “why” and “how.” Why do people behave the way they do? Why do people regularly fail at their goals? How can people make better plans to increase their chances of success? How do people experience emotions? How do emotions steer people’s motivation and behavior? The course will cover the major theoretical perspectives and methodologies related to the study of motivation. It starts with reflecting on the nature of motivation and attempting to track its evolutionary origins. These themes will be followed by a review of the core human motives of autonomy, competence, and belonging. Further, the course devotes four sessions to the goal attainment process, including discussions on goal setting, goal planning, and goal striving, which highlights the central role of goals in the field of motivation. Students will also be provided with an overview of the emerging work on automatic, unconscious motivation. Subsequently, the issue of emotion will be introduced, followed by a discussion of the effects of individual differences and social situations on motivation. The final lecture will introduce the interdisciplinary nature of motivation science by covering insights made in health and business psychology. This course features a format that mixes traditional class meetings with autonomous out-of-class learning. Class meetings will include a combination of lectures, activities (e.g., self-scoring the Self-Control Scale by Tangney et al., 2004), and discussions (e.g., peer-to-peer discussion among students). Specifically, class meetings will be used to teach students about a variety of theories, frameworks, and models that explain motivation, to explore extensions and applications of concepts and ideas, and to cover important or intriguing topics that are not addressed in the handbook. Note that reading and preparing are not included in class meetings. These activities are expected of students above and beyond the required meeting times.

General Psychology II: Self-Regulation Group A (Seminar)

Dozent/in: Timur Sevincer

Termin:
wöchentlich | Donnerstag | 10:15 - 11:45 | 17.10.2022 - 03.02.2023 | C 12.112 | Raum für 32 Personen benötigt

Inhalt: Why is it sometimes so hard to act in the way we would like to act? To eat less meat or sugar, quit smoking, go jogging, or take the bike rather than the car? Why do some people give up their goals easily? Can we downregulate our impulses? It is well established that a lot of people struggle with more sustainable behavior, reasonable diet, healthy routine, emotions, cigarettes, and alcohol every day, and that people can differ enormously in their ability to succeed in self-regulation. Self-regulation refers to people’s capacity to alter their thoughts, emotions, impulses, and behavior in the service of their goals. No matter what the goal is, effective self-regulation is necessary: people have to continuously regulate their thoughts, emotions, and behavior in order to maintain their goals and stay on the right track. Therefore, an understanding of the process of self-regulation is key to this course. In this seminar, we will discuss cutting-edge research on how people can use self-regulatory skills to bolster their self-control enabling them to successfully pursue goals in various domains, such as sustainability, health, academic, and professional goals. Topics covered in this seminar include basic regulatory processes, the cognitive dimension of self-regulation, nonconscious and conscious self-regulation, interventions and applications of self-regulation, and the role of personality in self-regulation. This course will help students to understand how to best regulate motivation and emotion from both intrapersonal and interpersonal perspectives. The primary teaching format used in this seminar includes a mixture of student presentations and discussions. In each session, scientific articles on a specific topic relevant to self-regulation will be assigned for reading and discussion. Each student will present at least one article during the seminar. The student presentations have been included to benefit both the collective and the individual. From a collective perspective, student presentations expose all students to more articles, enriching their knowledge while reducing the burden of having to read too many papers. From an individual perspective, student presentations help them hone their presentation and communication skills. As such, the students should prepare their presentations as if they were giving the talk at an academic conference. Thus, they will need to first set up the theoretical context and then select the most important studies to present. After each presentation, the discussion of the presentation, the respective article, and related research will be held between students and the instructor.

General Psychology II: Self-Regulation Group B (Seminar)

Dozent/in: Timur Sevincer

Termin:
wöchentlich | Donnerstag | 12:15 - 13:45 | 17.10.2022 - 27.10.2022 | C 12.102
wöchentlich | Donnerstag | 12:15 - 13:45 | 03.11.2022 - 03.02.2023 | C 12.001

Inhalt: Why is it sometimes so hard to act in the way we would like to act? To eat less meat or sugar, quit smoking, go jogging, or take the bike rather than the car? Why do some people give up their goals easily? Can we downregulate our impulses? It is well established that a lot of people struggle with more sustainable behavior, reasonable diet, healthy routine, emotions, cigarettes, and alcohol every day, and that people can differ enormously in their ability to succeed in self-regulation. Self-regulation refers to people’s capacity to alter their thoughts, emotions, impulses, and behavior in the service of their goals. No matter what the goal is, effective self-regulation is necessary: people have to continuously regulate their thoughts, emotions, and behavior in order to maintain their goals and stay on the right track. Therefore, an understanding of the process of self-regulation is key to this course. In this seminar, we will discuss cutting-edge research on how people can use self-regulatory skills to bolster their self-control enabling them to successfully pursue goals in various domains, such as sustainability, health, academic, and professional goals. Topics covered in this seminar include basic regulatory processes, the cognitive dimension of self-regulation, nonconscious and conscious self-regulation, interventions and applications of self-regulation, and the role of personality in self-regulation. This course will help students to understand how to best regulate motivation and emotion from both intrapersonal and interpersonal perspectives. The primary teaching format used in this seminar includes a mixture of student presentations and discussions. In each session, scientific articles on a specific topic relevant to self-regulation will be assigned for reading and discussion. Each student will present at least one article during the seminar. The student presentations have been included to benefit both the collective and the individual. From a collective perspective, student presentations expose all students to more articles, enriching their knowledge while reducing the burden of having to read too many papers. From an individual perspective, student presentations help them hone their presentation and communication skills. As such, the students should prepare their presentations as if they were giving the talk at an academic conference. Thus, they will need to first set up the theoretical context and then select the most important studies to present. After each presentation, the discussion of the presentation, the respective article, and related research will be held between students and the instructor.