Vorlesungsverzeichnis

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Veranstaltungen von Prof. Dr. Emer O'Sullivan


Lehrveranstaltungen

Downton Abbey, Titanic & Co. The Edwardian Era in 21st century British literature and film (Seminar)

Dozent/in: Emer O'Sullivan

Termin:
wöchentlich | Dienstag | 08:15 - 09:45 | 06.04.2020 - 10.07.2020 | C 5.310

Inhalt: Why is the tv series Downton Abbey so popular? Where does the current Titanic fever come from? The Edwardian Era is enjoying unprecedented popularity in contemporary Britain. The Edwardian era, named after the British King Edward VII who reigned from 1901-1910, is usually extended to include the outbreak of the First World War in 1914, sometimes up to the signing of the Treaty of Versailles in 1919. It was a time when the British class system was very rigid, but when social and political change started to emerge. It experienced exceptional technological change as a result of modern industrialisation, and during this time one-third of the world’s population were subjects of the British Empire. The Edwardian era is sometimes imagined as a romantic golden age of long summer afternoons and garden parties, basking in a sun that never set on the British Empire. This nostalgia about the era first came to being as early as the 1920s, and today, too, we find a fascination for the Edwardian era in British culture. This is partly, but not entirely, explained by the current centenaries – the sinking of the Titanic in 1912, the grand ocean liner which embodied human progress, opulence, and the excesses of the time, that of the outbreak of the First World War in 1914. In this seminar we will examine some contemporary British cultural products which engage with the era, some nostalgic, others more discerning. They will include films and literature about the Titanic, the television series "Downton Abbey" (Julian Fellowes/ITV 2010) and the novel about Edwardian childhood, "The Children’s Book" by A. S. Byatt (2009), amongst others. By examining the ways in which Britain engages with and interprets this particular period of its history today, we will try to identify where the fascination with the era lies. Is it in the in the class distinction of upstairs/downstairs? In the traditional and rigid social structures? In seemingly endless childhoods? In the innocence of the pre-War era? Underpinning these reflections will be a theoretical engagement with cultural memory studies.

Children's literature (Seminar)

Dozent/in: Emer O'Sullivan

Termin:
wöchentlich | Mittwoch | 08:15 - 09:45 | 06.04.2020 - 10.07.2020 | C 5.310

Inhalt: Children's literature has, since its beginnings in the 18th century, been a source both of entertainment and instruction for child readers as well as a product which reflects adults' perceptions of children and the choices that they make regarding what literature is suitable for the young. It is addressed to a wide range of readers from pre-literate toddlers to young adults and encompasses an equally wide range of genres including picturebooks, traditional folk and fairy tales, novels, poetry, and informational books. In this seminar, you will become familiar with a selection of literature in the English-speaking cultures across time, and learn to appreciate this branch of literature through close reading and work with different critical approaches. You will examine the distinctive qualities of children’s literature, explore the relation of didacticism and entertainment in texts for children at different historical periods, and consider the changing concepts of the child and its influence on the production of children's literature.

Imagined Geography: Strange places and people in 19th and 20th century literature (Seminar)

Dozent/in: Emer O'Sullivan

Termin:
wöchentlich | Dienstag | 14:15 - 15:45 | 06.04.2020 - 10.07.2020 | C 5.310

Inhalt: Defoe’s Robinson Crusoe (1719) and Swift’s Gulliver’s Travels (1726), amongst the first novels ever written, inspired two major narrative traditions in relation to portraying strange places and people: adventure stories set in exotic locations but told in a realistic mode, and fantastic journeys to invented realms. Since then, representations of the foreign, the exotic, both in the form of invented places but also in the form of imaginated discourse on purportedly real places and people, have been central elements in narrative fiction, and it is these that this seminar will examine. Guided by theoretical approaches furnished by imagology, theories of representation, postcolonialism, and the spatial turn in cultural studies, we will examine representations of imaginary and purportedly real foreign people and places in literary texts from different traditions such as travel literature, fantasy, and children’s literature, from early 19th century ABC books, through late 19th century board games and books inspired by Jules Verne’s journey around the world in 80 days, 20th century atlases of imaginary worlds, postmodern simulacra and contemporary texts in which foreign locations are given a playful, performative treatment.

Sherlock Holmes. From Victorian Detective to Pop Cultural Icon (FSL) (Seminar)

Dozent/in: Emer O'Sullivan

Termin:
wöchentlich | Montag | 14:15 - 15:45 | 06.04.2020 - 10.07.2020 | C 14.204 | digitale Veranstaltung

Inhalt: Sherlock Holmes is doubtlessly the most famous and popular detective literature has ever produced. First appearing in the story A Study in Scarlet, in 1887 and subsequently featuring in four novels and 56 short stories by Arthur Conan Doyle, he has since been adapted into every possible medium, as well as being the subject of countless prequels and sequels. In this seminar we will engage with the Victorian Sherlock Homes and the beginnings of the detective genre, looking at the images of modernity and modern science the stories present as well as the role of gender and race in them. We will look at a selection from the vast number of adaptations– including the film about the aged detective, Mr. Holmes (2015) and, of course, the BBC series „Sherlock“ (with Benedict Cumberbatch) which not only refers to the canon but takes different elements from it, transports them into our digital age and gives them a new, postmodern, twist. In the seminar we will engage with theories of adaptation and intertextuality and will ultimately try to identify the reasons for the perennial popularity of this iconic figure.

Promotionskolloquium PLG (Kolloquium)

Dozent/in: Sven Kramer, Emer O'Sullivan

Termin:
Einzeltermin | Fr, 26.06.2020, 12:00 - Fr, 26.06.2020, 18:00 | C 5.325

Inhalt: Im Promotionskolloquium für Philosophie, Literatur und Geschichte präsentieren Promovierende des Forschungskollegs für Philosophie, Literatur und Geschichte ihre Projekte und diskutieren sie in einem darauf folgenden Gespräch mit den Teilnehmenden des Kollegs. Dabei profitieren sie von der interdisziplinären Zusammensetzung des Kollegs.

Promotionskolloquium Englische Literaturwissenschaft (Kolloquium)

Dozent/in: Emer O'Sullivan

Termin:
Einzeltermin | Sa, 27.06.2020, 10:00 - Sa, 27.06.2020, 18:00 | C 5.109 | Zoom

Inhalt: A one day colloquium for doctoral candidates writing their theses in the area of English or Comparative Literature to discuss research design and methodology questions, engage in theoretical debates, and present and critique their dissertation projects.