Semester Topics

Every semester the DCRL organizes its collective research under a semester theme, under which a series of events then take place. These themes allow us to develop coherent research thematics while flexibly engaging with a number of subsidiary themes. We usually organize symposia, workshops and lectures, as well as a variety of more experimental and open event formats, such as conversations or barcamps.

The central ‘spine’ of the recent semester themes have been the DCRLectures. A “research lecture” is a hybrid conversation format that is both strict and flexible, frontal and collaborative, and addresses the central cluster of questions which form the foundation of the DCRL: Re-Thinking the Technological Condition, Methods, the Political, and Sociality.

View all Lectures on Vimeo


CDCevents, Summer Semester 2019

CDCevents, Outline of the Digital, Winter Semester 2018/2019

CDCevents, Summer Semester 2018

Critique in Digital Cultures, Winter Semester 2017/2018

Operations, Work, Labour, Summer Semester 2017

Design and Repair, Winter Semester 2016/2017

Economy, Ecology, Organizsation, Summer Semester 2016

Non-Knowledge, Winter Semester 2015/16

Un/Stable Infrastructures, Summer Semester 2015

Clouds and Collectivities, Winter Semester 2014/15

Other Lectures

27.11.2013
Paul Feigelfeld: The Great Loop Forward. Stille Post, Unvollständigkeit und digitale Kulturen zwischen China und Europa

29.01.2014
Bo Reimer: Collaborative Media Interventions Design, Production, Consumption and the Role of the Collaborative Media Researcher

08.04.2014
Andreas Bernard: Selbstdesign. Über das Menschenbild der Gegenwart

09.04.2014
Bernard Stiegler: About a Philosophy of the Automata and Automaticy

29.04.2014
Gabriele Klein: Soziale Choreografie. Zum Verhältnis von Körpern, Medien und Szene

27.05.2014
Timon Beyes: Aestethics, Organization and Digital Cultures. What makes sense and what can be sensed – Reconsidering the question of organization

17.06.2014
Baruch Gottlieb: Quanta of Sorge, Quanta of Cruelty, Toward labour models of digital aesthetics